Composting

 

Why Compost?

Compostable materials, such as yard and kitchen wastes make up more than 30% of household waste. Composting these materials goes a long way towards reaching the Fraser - Fort George Regional District's goal of reducing waste to landfill by 50%.

 

Goals aside; why send to the dump material that can enrich the soil and save you money? Finished compost can replace expensive chemical fertilizers and give you healthier shrubs, vegetables, flowers and grass.

 

What is Composting?

Composting is a natural process that occurs when plant material dies. Bacteria, fungi, worms and other organisms living in the soil and air transform dead plants, leaves, etc into a rich dark material called humus or compost. Take a look! This brochure shows the cycle of compost.

 

Backyard Composting

 

Anything that was once a living plant can be composted, but to make your compost work well you need a balance of nitrogen and carbon rich materials. All plants contain nitrogen and carbon but the ratio of nitrogen to carbon varies. Green materials such as grass clippings are high in nitrogen whereas brown materials such as the autumn leaves are high in carbon. If you use equal amounts of green and brown materials, i.e. one bucket of grass clippings and one bucket of leaves, you should obtain a good balance.The materials can be layered or mixed together. Mixing will start the compost working more quickly.

 

What To Put In?

    Compost Materials

    Materials To Avoid

 

Four Essential Ingredients for Good Composting

Nitrogen ... Carbon ... Water ... Oxygen

Balancing the supply of water and oxygen is essential for good composting. The decomposers need moisture to do their work. If the pile is too dry, nothing much will happen. If the pile is too wet it will smell. The pile should be as moist as a wrung-out sponge. Too wet a pile eliminates the essential oxygen that the decomposers need. Even with the right amount of moisture the pile tends to pack down and squeeze out the oxygen. To avoid this, aerate your pile at least once a week. A compost turner, shovel, garden fork, potato hoe or stirrup hoe, can be used to turn your pile. Use a tool that is easy on your back and that you are comfortable using. A lid can be helpful for retaining or repelling water. Click Here For Solutions to Composting Problems.

 

Building the Pile

Whether using a purchased or hand-built container, always start with a layer of twigs or coarse material such as straw to allow for good air circulation. Materials can then be added in layers no more than 10cm thick. Alternate the kinds of material used or mix them together. The smaller the materials are chopped or shredded, the faster the composting process will work. The pile should be at least one cubic metre in size but no larger than 3.5 cubic metres.

 

 

Vermicompost

(Composting with Worms)

 

Why Vermicomposting?

A natural method for recycling your kitchen scraps. It can be done year - round, indoors and outdoors, in apartments, houses, offices, and schools. The finished castings provide a good soil conditioner for houseplants, lawns and gardens.

 

Removing worms from their natural environment and placing them in containers creates a human responsibility. They are living, breathing creatures with their own unique needs, so it is important to create and maintain a healthy environment for them to continue to do their work. If you supply the essential ingredients and care, your worms will thrive and make rich castings for you.

 

Essentials to Vermicompost

  • Container (wood / plastic)
  • Worms (750 - 2000) approximately 1 pound - Worm Info
  • Bedding - Bedding Ingredients
  •  Kitchen wastes - Suggestions
  •  2 cups fine sand

 

How is it Done

  • Fill container with bedding and sand
  • Sprinkle with water until moist.
  • Add worms
  • Bury kitchen wastes in the bedding, alternate location at each feeding

 

What Occurs

Over 1-3 months the worms and micro - organisms eat the organic materials and bedding, producing rich castings. If problems occur find answers here

 

Worms Need

  • Dark, cool spot.
  • Kept from direct sunlight, heavy rain and cold
  • Below 4°C the vermicomposter should be moved inside

 

Local Worm Suppliers

  • Bubba’s Bait Barn, Vanderhoof, BC 1-250-567-4155
  • Northern Worm Ranch, Beaverley, BC 1- 250-552-3919

Composters and Rainbarrels

 

Rain Barrels: The City of Prince George and REAPS have partnered to provide Rain Barrels for residents of Prince George. Cream rain barrels are $75. A WaterSaver downspout rainwater diverter simplifies the collection of rainwater. It installs in minutes and deactivates in winter in seconds. Cost $20

 

Composters: REAPS sells the Earth Machine composters for the RDFFG for $50 and the wingdigger (composter turner) for $15.

 

Do your part to help Mother Earth. To buy any of the above, stop by the garden daily between 12:30 and 4:30pm, 1950 Gorse Street by Lheidli T'enneh Memorial Park (end of 20th Avenue).

 

 

Worm Info

Red Wrigglers (Eisenia fetida)

 

Red Wrigglers (Eisenia fetida) are the best because they thrive on organic materials. They can be purchased from Northern Worm Ranch, 11675 Family Place Road, Prince George, British Columbia - (250) 552-3919, found in aged horse manure piles, leaf piles or obtained from a friend.

 

For every 1 pound of kitchen wastes per day, you will need 2 pounds of worms (approximately 2000 worms). If you are unable to get this many worms or do not produce this amount of kitchen wastes reduce accordingly.

 

Red Wrigglers produce 2 - 3 cocoons per week for 6 months to a year once they reach sexual maturity in 3 - 4 weeks from hatching. Each cocoon will contain 1 - 14 babies, which will hatch in approximately 3 weeks. The cocoons appear white when first produced and gradually turn to a deep brown-red colour before hatching. They will only breed to the holding capacity of the bin, therefore they will not overpopulate.

 

Creating the optimum conditions in your vericomposter you can successfully breed and produce castings. Three important facts are food, space and a moist, cool environment.

Worm Food

 

A variety of kitchen wastes ensures the worms are receiving all the required nutrients and provides richer castings. Bury the kitchen wastes by pulling aside the bedding, dumping in the waste and covering the waste with bedding. Alternate the burying spots in the bin to ensure the bedding is digested as well. Waste Suggestions

Harvesting The Worms

 

After 1 - 3 months, little original bedding should be visible in the bin; it will appear brown and earthy. The worms need to be sorted from the from the brown earthy material and more bedding needs to be added. Sorting Instructions

More Info

 

To learn more about worms visit our worm anatomy section:

  •     Worm Anatomy 101
  •     Nervous System
  •     Reproductive System

 

 

 

Thank you to the BC Direct Access Program for continued provision of grants to the REAPS Sustainable Community Enhancement Program

Thank you to the City of Prince George for their ongoing support, building and property for the delivery of our programs.

Thank you to the Regional District of Fraser-Fort George for providing the major operational funding since 1995

REAPS Prince George

Phone: (250) 561-7327  |  webmaster@reaps.org

Composting

 

Why Compost?

Compostable materials, such as yard and kitchen wastes make up more than 30% of household waste. Composting these materials goes a long way towards reaching the Fraser - Fort George Regional District's goal of reducing waste to landfill by 50%.

 

Goals aside; why send to the dump material that can enrich the soil and save you money? Finished compost can replace expensive chemical fertilizers and give you healthier shrubs, vegetables, flowers and grass.

 

What is Composting?

Composting is a natural process that occurs when plant material dies. Bacteria, fungi, worms and other organisms living in the soil and air transform dead plants, leaves, etc into a rich dark material called humus or compost. Take a look! This brochure shows the cycle of compost.

 

 

Backyard Composting

 

Anything that was once a living plant can be composted, but to make your compost work well you need a balance of nitrogen and carbon rich materials. All plants contain nitrogen and carbon but the ratio of nitrogen to carbon varies. Green materials such as grass clippings are high in nitrogen whereas brown materials such as the autumn leaves are high in carbon. If you use equal amounts of green and brown materials, i.e. one bucket of grass clippings and one bucket of leaves, you should obtain a good balance.The materials can be layered or mixed together. Mixing will start the compost working more quickly.

 

What To Put In?

    Compost Materials

    Materials To Avoid

 

Four Essential Ingredients for Good Composting

Nitrogen ... Carbon ... Water ... Oxygen

Balancing the supply of water and oxygen is essential for good composting. The decomposers need moisture to do their work. If the pile is too dry, nothing much will happen. If the pile is too wet it will smell. The pile should be as moist as a wrung-out sponge. Too wet a pile eliminates the essential oxygen that the decomposers need. Even with the right amount of moisture the pile tends to pack down and squeeze out the oxygen. To avoid this, aerate your pile at least once a week. A compost turner, shovel, garden fork, potato hoe or stirrup hoe, can be used to turn your pile. Use a tool that is easy on your back and that you are comfortable using. A lid can be helpful for retaining or repelling water. Click Here For Solutions to Composting Problems.

 

Building the Pile

Whether using a purchased or hand-built container, always start with a layer of twigs or coarse material such as straw to allow for good air circulation. Materials can then be added in layers no more than 10cm thick. Alternate the kinds of material used or mix them together. The smaller the materials are chopped or shredded, the faster the composting process will work. The pile should be at least one cubic metre in size but no larger than 3.5 cubic metres.

 

 

Vermicompost

(Composting with Worms)

 

Why Vermicomposting?

A natural method for recycling your kitchen scraps. It can be done year - round, indoors and outdoors, in apartments, houses, offices, and schools. The finished castings provide a good soil conditioner for houseplants, lawns and gardens.

 

Removing worms from their natural environment and placing them in containers creates a human responsibility. They are living, breathing creatures with their own unique needs, so it is important to create and maintain a healthy environment for them to continue to do their work. If you supply the essential ingredients and care, your worms will thrive and make rich castings for you.

 

Essentials to Vermicompost

  • Container (wood / plastic)
  • Worms (750 - 2000) approximately 1 pound - Worm Info
  • Bedding - Bedding Ingredients
  •  Kitchen wastes - Suggestions
  •  2 cups fine sand

 

How is it Done

  • Fill container with bedding and sand
  • Sprinkle with water until moist.
  • Add worms
  • Bury kitchen wastes in the bedding, alternate location at each feeding

 

What Occurs

Over 1-3 months the worms and micro - organisms eat the organic materials and bedding, producing rich castings. If problems occur find answers here

 

Worms Need

  • Dark, cool spot.
  • Kept from direct sunlight, heavy rain and cold
  • Below 4°C the vermicomposter should be moved inside

 

Local Worm Suppliers

  • Bubba’s Bait Barn, Vanderhoof, BC 1-250-567-4155
  • Northern Worm Ranch, Beaverley, BC 1- 250-552-3919

 

 

 

Composters and Rainbarrels

 

Rain Barrels: The City of Prince George and REAPS have partnered to provide Rain Barrels for residents of Prince George. Cream rain barrels are $75. A WaterSaver downspout rainwater diverter simplifies the collection of rainwater. It installs in minutes and deactivates in winter in seconds. Cost $20

 

Composters: REAPS sells the Earth Machine composters for the RDFFG for $50 and the wingdigger (composter turner) for $15.

 

Do your part to help Mother Earth. To buy any of the above, stop by the garden daily May through September between 12:30 and 4:30pm, 1950 Gorse Street by Lheidli T'enneh Memorial Park (end of 20th Avenue).

 

 

Worm Info

Red Wrigglers (Eisenia fetida)

 

Red Wrigglers (Eisenia fetida) are the best because they thrive on organic materials. They can be purchased from Northern Worm Ranch, 11675 Family Place Road, Prince George, British Columbia - (250) 552-3919, found in aged horse manure piles, leaf piles or obtained from a friend.

 

For every 1 pound of kitchen wastes per day, you will need 2 pounds of worms (approximately 2000 worms). If you are unable to get this many worms or do not produce this amount of kitchen wastes reduce accordingly.

 

Red Wrigglers produce 2 - 3 cocoons per week for 6 months to a year once they reach sexual maturity in 3 - 4 weeks from hatching. Each cocoon will contain 1 - 14 babies, which will hatch in approximately 3 weeks. The cocoons appear white when first produced and gradually turn to a deep brown-red colour before hatching. They will only breed to the holding capacity of the bin, therefore they will not overpopulate.

 

Creating the optimum conditions in your vericomposter you can successfully breed and produce castings. Three important facts are food, space and a moist, cool environment.

Worm Food

 

A variety of kitchen wastes ensures the worms are receiving all the required nutrients and provides richer castings. Bury the kitchen wastes by pulling aside the bedding, dumping in the waste and covering the waste with bedding. Alternate the burying spots in the bin to ensure the bedding is digested as well. Waste Suggestions

Harvesting The Worms

 

After 1 - 3 months, little original bedding should be visible in the bin; it will appear brown and earthy. The worms need to be sorted from the from the brown earthy material and more bedding needs to be added. Sorting Instructions

More Info

 

To learn more about worms visit our worm anatomy section:

  •     Worm Anatomy 101
  •     Nervous System
  •     Reproductive System

 

 

 

Composting

 

Why Compost?

Compostable materials, such as yard and kitchen wastes make up more than 30% of household waste. Composting these materials goes a long way towards reaching the Fraser - Fort George Regional District's goal of reducing waste to landfill by 50%.

 

Goals aside; why send to the dump material that can enrich the soil and save you money? Finished compost can replace expensive chemical fertilizers and give you healthier shrubs, vegetables, flowers and grass.

 

What is Composting?

Composting is a natural process that occurs when plant material dies. Bacteria, fungi, worms and other organisms living in the soil and air transform dead plants, leaves, etc into a rich dark material called humus or compost. Take a look! This brochure shows the cycle of compost.

 

Backyard Composting

 

Anything that was once a living plant can be composted, but to make your compost work well you need a balance of nitrogen and carbon rich materials. All plants contain nitrogen and carbon but the ratio of nitrogen to carbon varies. Green materials such as grass clippings are high in nitrogen whereas brown materials such as the autumn leaves are high in carbon. If you use equal amounts of green and brown materials, i.e. one bucket of grass clippings and one bucket of leaves, you should obtain a good balance.The materials can be layered or mixed together. Mixing will start the compost working more quickly.

 

What To Put In?

Compost Materials

Materials To Avoid

 

Four Essential Ingredients for Good Composting

Nitrogen ... Carbon ... Water ... Oxygen

Balancing the supply of water and oxygen is essential for good composting. The decomposers need moisture to do their work. If the pile is too dry, nothing much will happen. If the pile is too wet it will smell. The pile should be as moist as a wrung-out sponge. Too wet a pile eliminates the essential oxygen that the decomposers need. Even with the right amount of moisture the pile tends to pack down and squeeze out the oxygen. To avoid this, aerate your pile at least once a week. A compost turner, shovel, garden fork, potato hoe or stirrup hoe, can be used to turn your pile. Use a tool that is easy on your back and that you are comfortable using. A lid can be helpful for retaining or repelling water. Click Here For Solutions to Composting Problems.

 

Building the Pile

Whether using a purchased or hand-built container, always start with a layer of twigs or coarse material such as straw to allow for good air circulation. Materials can then be added in layers no more than 10cm thick. Alternate the kinds of material used or mix them together. The smaller the materials are chopped or shredded, the faster the composting process will work. The pile should be at least one cubic metre in size but no larger than 3.5 cubic metres.

 

Vermicompost

(Composting with Worms)

 

Why Vermicomposting?

A natural method for recycling your kitchen scraps. It can be done year - round, indoors and outdoors, in apartments, houses, offices, and schools. The finished castings provide a good soil conditioner for houseplants, lawns and gardens.

 

Removing worms from their natural environment and placing them in containers creates a human responsibility. They are living, breathing creatures with their own unique needs, so it is important to create and maintain a healthy environment for them to continue to do their work. If you supply the essential ingredients and care, your worms will thrive and make rich castings for you.

 

Essentials to Vermicompost

  • Container (wood / plastic)
  • Worms (750 - 2000) approximately 1 pound - Worm Info
  • Bedding - Bedding Ingredients
  •  Kitchen wastes - Suggestions
  •  2 cups fine sand

 

How is it Done

  • Fill container with bedding and sand
  • Sprinkle with water until moist.
  • Add worms
  • Bury kitchen wastes in the bedding, alternate location at each feeding

 

What Occurs

Over 1-3 months the worms and micro - organisms eat the organic materials and bedding, producing rich castings. If problems occur find answers here

 

Worms Need

  • Dark, cool spot.
  • Kept from direct sunlight, heavy rain and cold
  • Below 4°C the vermicomposter should be moved inside

 

Local Worm Suppliers

  • Bubba’s Bait Barn, Vanderhoof, BC 1-250-567-4155
  • Northern Worm Ranch, Beaverley, BC 1- 250-552-3919

 

 

Composters and Rainbarrels

 

 

Rain Barrels: The City of Prince George and REAPS have partnered to provide Rain Barrels for residents of Prince George. Cream rain barrels are $75. A WaterSaver downspout rainwater diverter simplifies the collection of rainwater. It installs in minutes and deactivates in winter in seconds. Cost $20

 

 

Composters: REAPS sells the Earth Machine composters for the RDFFG for $50 and the wingdigger (composter turner) for $15.

 

Do your part to help Mother Earth. To buy any of the above, stop by the garden daily between 12:30 and 4:30pm, 1950 Gorse Street by Lheidli T'enneh Memorial Park (end of 20th Avenue).

 

 

Worm Info

Red Wrigglers (Eisenia fetida)

 

Red Wrigglers (Eisenia fetida) are the best because they thrive on organic materials. They can be purchased from Northern Worm Ranch, 11675 Family Place Road, Prince George, British Columbia - (250) 552-3919, found in aged horse manure piles, leaf piles or obtained from a friend.

 

For every 1 pound of kitchen wastes per day, you will need 2 pounds of worms (approximately 2000 worms). If you are unable to get this many worms or do not produce this amount of kitchen wastes reduce accordingly.

 

Red Wrigglers produce 2 - 3 cocoons per week for 6 months to a year once they reach sexual maturity in 3 - 4 weeks from hatching. Each cocoon will contain 1 - 14 babies, which will hatch in approximately 3 weeks. The cocoons appear white when first produced and gradually turn to a deep brown-red colour before hatching. They will only breed to the holding capacity of the bin, therefore they will not overpopulate.

 

Creating the optimum conditions in your vericomposter you can successfully breed and produce castings. Three important facts are food, space and a moist, cool environment.

Worm Food

 

A variety of kitchen wastes ensures the worms are receiving all the required nutrients and provides richer castings. Bury the kitchen wastes by pulling aside the bedding, dumping in the waste and covering the waste with bedding. Alternate the burying spots in the bin to ensure the bedding is digested as well. Waste Suggestions

Harvesting The Worms

 

After 1 - 3 months, little original bedding should be visible in the bin; it will appear brown and earthy. The worms need to be sorted from the from the brown earthy material and more bedding needs to be added. Sorting Instructions

More Info

 

To learn more about worms visit our worm anatomy section:

  •     Worm Anatomy 101
  •     Nervous System
  •     Reproductive System

 

 

 

Composting

 

Why Compost?

Compostable materials, such as yard and kitchen wastes make up more than 30% of household waste. Composting these materials goes a long way towards reaching the Fraser - Fort George Regional District's goal of reducing waste to landfill by 50%.

 

Goals aside; why send to the dump material that can enrich the soil and save you money? Finished compost can replace expensive chemical fertilizers and give you healthier shrubs, vegetables, flowers and grass.

 

What is Composting?

Composting is a natural process that occurs when plant material dies. Bacteria, fungi, worms and other organisms living in the soil and air transform dead plants, leaves, etc into a rich dark material called humus or compost. Take a look! This brochure shows the cycle of compost.

 

Backyard Composting

 

Anything that was once a living plant can be composted, but to make your compost work well you need a balance of nitrogen and carbon rich materials. All plants contain nitrogen and carbon but the ratio of nitrogen to carbon varies. Green materials such as grass clippings are high in nitrogen whereas brown materials such as the autumn leaves are high in carbon. If you use equal amounts of green and brown materials, i.e. one bucket of grass clippings and one bucket of leaves, you should obtain a good balance.The materials can be layered or mixed together. Mixing will start the compost working more quickly.

 

What To Put In?

Compost Materials

Materials To Avoid

 

Four Essential Ingredients for Good Composting

Nitrogen ... Carbon ... Water ... Oxygen

Balancing the supply of water and oxygen is essential for good composting. The decomposers need moisture to do their work. If the pile is too dry, nothing much will happen. If the pile is too wet it will smell. The pile should be as moist as a wrung-out sponge. Too wet a pile eliminates the essential oxygen that the decomposers need. Even with the right amount of moisture the pile tends to pack down and squeeze out the oxygen. To avoid this, aerate your pile at least once a week. A compost turner, shovel, garden fork, potato hoe or stirrup hoe, can be used to turn your pile. Use a tool that is easy on your back and that you are comfortable using. A lid can be helpful for retaining or repelling water. Click Here For Solutions to Composting Problems.

 

Building the Pile

Whether using a purchased or hand-built container, always start with a layer of twigs or coarse material such as straw to allow for good air circulation. Materials can then be added in layers no more than 10cm thick. Alternate the kinds of material used or mix them together. The smaller the materials are chopped or shredded, the faster the composting process will work. The pile should be at least one cubic metre in size but no larger than 3.5 cubic metres.

 

Vermicompost

(Composting with Worms)

 

Why Vermicomposting?

A natural method for recycling your kitchen scraps. It can be done year - round, indoors and outdoors, in apartments, houses, offices, and schools. The finished castings provide a good soil conditioner for houseplants, lawns and gardens.

 

Removing worms from their natural environment and placing them in containers creates a human responsibility. They are living, breathing creatures with their own unique needs, so it is important to create and maintain a healthy environment for them to continue to do their work. If you supply the essential ingredients and care, your worms will thrive and make rich castings for you.

 

Essentials to Vermicompost

  • Container (wood / plastic)
  • Worms (750 - 2000) approximately 1 pound - Worm Info
  • Bedding - Bedding Ingredients
  •  Kitchen wastes - Suggestions
  •  2 cups fine sand

 

How is it Done

  • Fill container with bedding and sand
  • Sprinkle with water until moist.
  • Add worms
  • Bury kitchen wastes in the bedding, alternate location at each feeding

 

What Occurs

Over 1-3 months the worms and micro - organisms eat the organic materials and bedding, producing rich castings. If problems occur find answers here

 

Worms Need

  • Dark, cool spot.
  • Kept from direct sunlight, heavy rain and cold
  • Below 4°C the vermicomposter should be moved inside

 

Local Worm Suppliers

  • Bubba’s Bait Barn, Vanderhoof, BC 1-250-567-4155
  • Northern Worm Ranch, Beaverley, BC 1- 250-552-3919

 

 

Composters and Rainbarrels

 

 

Rain Barrels: The City of Prince George and REAPS have partnered to provide Rain Barrels for residents of Prince George. Cream rain barrels are $75. A WaterSaver downspout rainwater diverter simplifies the collection of rainwater. It installs in minutes and deactivates in winter in seconds. Cost $20

 

 

Composters: REAPS sells the Earth Machine composters for the RDFFG for $50 and the wingdigger (composter turner) for $15.

 

Do your part to help Mother Earth. To buy any of the above, stop by the garden daily between 12:30 and 4:30pm, 1950 Gorse Street by Lheidli T'enneh Memorial Park (end of 20th Avenue).

 

 

Worm Info

Red Wrigglers (Eisenia fetida)

 

Red Wrigglers (Eisenia fetida) are the best because they thrive on organic materials. They can be purchased from Northern Worm Ranch, 11675 Family Place Road, Prince George, British Columbia - (250) 552-3919, found in aged horse manure piles, leaf piles or obtained from a friend.

 

For every 1 pound of kitchen wastes per day, you will need 2 pounds of worms (approximately 2000 worms). If you are unable to get this many worms or do not produce this amount of kitchen wastes reduce accordingly.

 

Red Wrigglers produce 2 - 3 cocoons per week for 6 months to a year once they reach sexual maturity in 3 - 4 weeks from hatching. Each cocoon will contain 1 - 14 babies, which will hatch in approximately 3 weeks. The cocoons appear white when first produced and gradually turn to a deep brown-red colour before hatching. They will only breed to the holding capacity of the bin, therefore they will not overpopulate.

 

Creating the optimum conditions in your vericomposter you can successfully breed and produce castings. Three important facts are food, space and a moist, cool environment.

Worm Food

 

A variety of kitchen wastes ensures the worms are receiving all the required nutrients and provides richer castings. Bury the kitchen wastes by pulling aside the bedding, dumping in the waste and covering the waste with bedding. Alternate the burying spots in the bin to ensure the bedding is digested as well. Waste Suggestions

Harvesting The Worms

 

After 1 - 3 months, little original bedding should be visible in the bin; it will appear brown and earthy. The worms need to be sorted from the from the brown earthy material and more bedding needs to be added. Sorting Instructions

More Info

 

To learn more about worms visit our worm anatomy section:

  •     Worm Anatomy 101
  •     Nervous System
  •     Reproductive System